No Bear Market In Gold. “Bullish Sentiment” in the Market for Physical Gold Bullion

You know that gold bear market that the financial press keeps touting? The one George Soros keeps proclaiming? Well, it is not there. The gold bear market is disinformation that is helping elites acquire the gold.

Certainly, Soros himself doesn’t believe it, as the 13-F release issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 15 proves. George Soros has significantly increased his gold holding by purchasing $25.2 million of call options on the GDXJ Junior Gold Miners Index.

In addition, the Soros Fund maintains a $32 million stake in individual mines; added 1.1 million shares of GDX (a gold miners ETF) to its holdings which now stand at 2,666,000 shares valued at $70,400,000; has 1,100,000 shares in GDXJ valued at $11,506,000; and 530,000 shares in the GLD gold fund valued at $69,467,000. [values as of May 17]

The 13-F release shows the Soros Fund with $239,200,000 in gold investments. If this is bearish sentiment, what would it take to be bullish?

The media reports that Soros had sold his gold holdings came from misinterpreting the reason Soros’ holdings in the GLD gold trust declined. Soros did not sell the shares; he redeemed the paper claims for physical gold. Watching the gold ETFs, such as GLD, being looted by banksters, Soros cashed in some of his own paper gold for the real stuff.

The giveaway that Soros is extremely bullish on gold comes not only from his extensive holdings, but also from his $25.2 million call option on junior gold stocks. This is a highly leveraged bet on the weakest gold mines. With high production costs and falling gold price from constant short selling in the paper market, Soros’ bet makes no sense unless he thinks gold is heading up as the short raids concentrate gold in elite possession.

In previous articles I have explained how heavy short-selling triggers stop-loss orders and margin calls on investors in gold ETFs. Scared out of their shares or forced out by margin calls, investors’ add to the downward price pressure caused by the shorts. Bullion banks and prominent investors such as Soros are the only ones who can redeem GLD shares for physical metal. They purchase the shares that are sold in response to the falling gold price, and present the shares for redemption in gold metal.

Insiders familiar with the process describe it as looting the ETFs of their gold basis.

In my last column I described how the orchestration of a falling gold price in the paper market protects the dollar’s value from the Federal Reserve’s policy of printing 1,000 billion new ones annually. The other beneficiary of the operation is the financial elite who buy up at low prices the ETF shares sold into a falling market and redeem them for gold. Like all other forms of wealth in the West, gold is being concentrated in fewer hands, while the elite shout “bear market, get out of gold.”

The orchestrated decline in gold and silver prices is apparent from the fact that the demand for bullion in the physical market has increased while short sales in the paper market imply a flight from bullion. As a hedge fund manager told me, it is a Wall Street axiom that volume follows price. Bull markets are characterized by rising prices on high volume. Conversely bear markets feature declining prices on low volume. The current bear market in gold consists of paper gold declining steadily while demand has escalated rapidly for physical metal. This strongly indicates that demand for physical gold continues to be in a bull market despite the savage attacks on paper gold.

If the orchestration is apparent to me, a person with no experience as a gold trader, it certainly must be apparent to federal regulators. But don’t expect any action from the Commodities Future Trading Corporation. It is headed by a former Goldman Sachs executive.

And don’t expect any investigation from the financial press. The financial press sees a bear market while supplies of bullion decline, premiums over spot rise, and even publicly declared bears such as George Soros make highly leveraged bets that will fail in the absence of a bull market in gold.

Source: http://www.globalresearch.ca/no-bear-market-in-gold-bullish-sentiment-in-the-market-for-physical-gold-bullion/5335795

No Bear Market In Gold

You know that gold bear market that the financial press keeps touting? The one George Soros keeps proclaiming? Well, it is not there. The gold bear market is disinformation that is helping elites acquire the gold.

Certainly, Soros himself doesn’t believe it, as the 13-F release issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 15 proves. George Soros has significantly increased his gold holding by purchasing $25.2 million of call options on the GDXJ Junior Gold Miners Index.

In addition the Soros Fund maintains a $32 million stake in individual mines; added 1.1 million shares of GDX (a gold miners ETF) to its holdings which now stand at 2,666,000 shares valued at $70,400,000; has 1,100,000 shares in GDXJ valued at $11,506,000; and 530,000 shares in the GLD gold fund valued at $69,467,000. [values as of May 17]

The 13-F release shows the Soros Fund with $239,200,000 in gold investments. If this is bearish sentiment, what would it take to be bullish?

The misinformation that Soros had sold his gold holdings came from misinterpreting the reason Soros’ holdings in the GLD gold trust declined. Soros did not sell the shares; he redeemed the paper claims for physical gold. Watching the gold ETFs, such as GLD, being looted by banksters, Soros cashed in some of his own paper gold for the real stuff.

The giveaway that Soros is extremely bullish on gold comes not only from his extensive holdings, but also from his $25.2 million call option on junior gold stocks. This is a highly leveraged bet on the weakest gold mines. With high production costs and falling gold price from constant short selling in the paper market, Soros’ bet makes no sense unless he thinks gold is heading up as the short raids concentrate gold in elite possession.
In previous articles I have explained how heavy short-selling triggers stop-loss orders and margin calls on investors in gold ETFs. Scared out of their shares or forced out by margin calls, investors’ add to the downward price pressure caused by the shorts. Bullion banks and prominent investors such as Soros are the only ones who can redeem GLD shares for physical metal. They purchase the shares that are sold in response to the falling gold price, and present the shares for redemption in gold metal.

Insiders familiar with the process describe it as looting the ETFs of their gold basis.

In my last column I described how the orchestration of a falling gold price in the paper market protects the dollar’s value from the Federal Reserve’s policy of printing 1,000 billion new ones annually. The other beneficiary of the operation is the financial elite who buy up at low prices the ETF shares sold into a falling market and redeem them for gold. Like all other forms of wealth in the West, gold is being concentrated in fewer hands, while the elite shout “bear market, get out of gold.”

The orchestrated decline in gold and silver prices is apparent from the fact that the demand for bullion in the physical market has increased while short sales in the paper market imply a flight from bullion. As a hedge fund manager told me, it is a Wall Street axiom that volume follows price. Bull markets are characterized by rising prices on high volume. Conversely bear markets feature declining prices on low volume. The current bear market in gold consists of paper gold declining steadily while demand has escalated rapidly for physical metal. This strongly indicates that demand for physical gold continues to be in a bull market despite the savage attacks on paper gold.

If the orchestration is apparent to me, a person with no experience as a gold trader, it certainly must be apparent to federal regulators. But don’t expect any action from the Commodities Future Trading Corporation. It is headed by a former Goldman Sachs executive.

And don’t expect any investigation from the financial press. The financial press sees a bear market while supplies of bullion decline, premiums over spot rise, and even publicly declared bears such as George Soros make highly leveraged bets that will fail in the absence of a bull market in gold.

Source: http://www.activistpost.com/2013/05/no-bear-market-in-gold.html

The Smartest Dictator of Them All Seizes All the Gold

You’ve got to love this guy, Hugo Chavez.

The President of Venezuela had already nationalized the banks and the oil industry. Now he’s going after the gold.

Chavez took to state television yesterday to tell his people that the gold industry is “run by the mafia,” so “We’re going to nationalize gold. We can’t keep allowing them to take it away.”

The Venezuelan leader said he would nationalize gold through a decree that he will issue in the next few days. Chavez said, “We’re going to convert it (gold)…into international reserves because gold continues to increase in value.”

Venezuela has large gold deposits. Gold mining in the country accounts for the production of about four tonnes of gold per year. Last year, Chavez told gold-mining companies that they could export 50% of the gold they produce, with the other 50% going to Venezuela’s central bank. Now he’s taking it all.

My simple interpretation of Chavez’s actions is as simple as Chavez himself: he has witnessed the value of the U.S. dollar plummeting against other world currencies since early 2009. He has also been witness to an outstanding rise in the national debt of the U.S., the downgrading of the U.S. credit rating, and the spectacular rise in the price of gold. He thinks he sees the writing on the wall. He may be right this time.

Michael’s Personal Notes:

Boy, was he ever wrong!

I’m talking about George Soros. His Soros Fund Management LLC sold 99% of its gold holdings in the first quarter of this year, as Soros was calling gold at that time “the ultimate asset bubble.” He was very wrong. Gold bullion has risen more than $400.00 an ounce, or 30%, since March 31, 2011.

I can understand Soros’ concern. Speculators are getting into the action big time. Options on the Comex to buy gold in the future at higher prices are the most popular and widely held. Since speculators often catch the tail end of a move, so much interest in gold call options is unsettling.

But let’s face the facts, after such a great year for gold bullion prices so far, I don’t think any of my readers would be disappointed to see a major correction start. I hope they would use that opportunity to average down their gold investments, as I would.

On the positive side, in respect to real demand, fear about Europe’s banking system with sovereign debt issues persisting is resulting in real demand for gold. Rand Refinery Ltd., which runs the world’s biggest gold refining operation pumping out the world-famous Krugerrands, can’t make the coins fast enough to supply demand.

Yes, speculators are in the options pits big-time betting that gold will go higher, which is worrisome. And demand for gold coins is also rapid.

Like all healthy bull markets, a good correction once in a while is needed to take the speculators out of the market. But don’t let a pull-back or correction in this long-running gold bull market deter you from looking at the glass as being half full, not half empty.

Where the Market Stands; Where it’s Headed:

We started the month with some big 400- to 500-point drops on the Dow Jones Industrial Average and with Standard and Poor’s downgrading of the U.S.’s credit rating. Investors got nervous and dumped their equity funds. And, just halfway through the month, stocks have almost recovered to almost breakeven for 2011. Another lesson in the risks of following the herd.

I continue to believe that we are in a bear market rally in stocks that started in March of 2009. That bear market rally is long in the tooth, but still has life left in it to drive stock prices higher in the immediate term.

What He Said:

“The conversation at parties is no longer about the stock market; it’s about real estate. ‘Our home has gone up this much’ or ‘Our country home has doubled in price.’ Looking around today, it would be very difficult to find people who believe that one day it could be out of vogue to own real estate because properties would be such a bad investment. Those investors who believe a dark day will never come for the property market are just fooling themselves.” Michael Lombardi in PROFIT CONFIDENTIAL, June 6, 2005. Michael started warning about the crisis coming in the U.S. real estate market right at the peak of the boom, now widely believed to be 2005.