Silver To Eclipse $100 On Skyrocketing Chinese Demand

With gold and silver rebounding, today acclaimed money manager Stephen Leeb told King World News that silver is now setting up to eclipse $100.  Leeb believes that China, which has been the primary driver in the gold market, is now going to push the silver price over $100 as their consumption of physical silver is poised to skyrocket.  Here is what Leeb had to say in this powerful and exclusive  interview.

Leeb:  “We are seeing massive demand for photovoltaics out of both Japan and China.  We are also continuing to see massive demand for silver in the Middle-East for this type of energy infrastructure as well.  Eric, KWN readers need to understand that the demand for silver is literally set to explode because of the enormous increases in demand for physical silver because of photovoltaics….

“While all of this is happening, the mainstream media is saying that China is about ready to fall apart.  But the reality is that China plans to urbanize a remarkable 200 million people over the next 10 to 15 years.  Well, the cost is roughly $50,000 per person.  So China is going to be spending a massive amount of money for materials — copper, lead, zinc and especially silver.

Source: http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/KWN_DailyWeb/Entries/2013/7/16_Silver_To_Eclipse_$100_On_Skyrocketing_Chinese_Demand.html

Sell Equities And Buy Physical Gold Now While Prices Are Low

Faber said it’s a good idea to take money out of the stock market.

“I don’t think there is a lot of upside potential, but I think there is considerable downside,” he said.

Marc Faber, managing director of Marc Faber Limited and the author of the widely read monthly investment newsletter “Gloom, Boom & Doom” report, said weakness in China’s economy could spell big trouble global markets.

Faber said that if the Chinese economy grows at 3 or 4 percent—or even not at all, which he sees as a possibility—it will have a huge, negative affect on industrial commodities and the incomes of countries that produce them. In turn, he said, if countries such as Russia, Brazil or nations in Africa, Central Asia or the Middle East have less income, they’ll buy less from China, Western Europe and America, leading to very little earnings growth or an earnings contraction for those more prosperous economies.

China preferably would show trend line growth of 10 percent, as it has done for the past 20 years, Faber said.

Faber said it’s a good idea to take money out of the stock market.

“I don’t think there is a lot of upside potential, but I think there is considerable downside,” he said.

However, he said that markets are now seeing emerging markets and their currencies go lower, and “It could be that all the money in the world flows in to U.S. stocks and avoids emerging markets.”

Gold can eventually be a source of profit, according to Faber. He said it’s possible the price of gold can go somewhat lower, even though he thinks it’s now at a reasonable level. “I keep on buying gold and I have faith that gold prices will eventually be higher,” Faber said.

Faber said that, in general, corporate earnings will disappoint.

“They may not collapse, but I don’t think they will be as a good as expected,” Faber said. He said cyclical stocks, such as semiconductors and materials companies, will have tough time matching earnings expectations.

U.S. aluminum giant Alcoa kicks off the unofficial start to quarterly earnings season after the closing bell on Monday.

Source: http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/big-data-download/mark-faber-china-puts-global-markets-risk-164954983.html

China’s gold imports remain massive

The gold price has been in a tailspin this year, but physical demand for the yellow metal remains as robust as ever in China.

New data shows that net Chinese gold imports jumped 40% in May from the month before. Total imports from Hong Kong reached their second highest level ever during the month, behind only March of this year.

To put the numbers in perspective, analysts at Stifel Nicolaus noted that China has already imported about 20 million ounces of gold in 2013, compared to 26.7 million in all of 2012 and 13.8 million in all of 2011. If these import numbers hold up through the year, they would be equivalent to 50% of global mine production, or 35% of total world supply.

Those are huge figures, and they show that China is taking advantage of the drop in price to load up on bullion. To date, however, that buying has not been enough to stem the price decline.

“Investor selling in developed markets has continued to overwhelm the still robust physical demand in Asia and emerging markets. This will take time to play out,” the Stifel analysts wrote.

They remain bullish on gold, noting the recent unrest in emerging markets and the Middle East, sustained low interest rates, sovereign debt issues, and the fact that the U.S. monetary base is up another 18% so far this year.

Source: http://business.financialpost.com/2013/07/05/chinas-gold-imports-remain-massive/