Hinde Capital On China, Gold, AndThe Continuing Unravelling Of Our Monetary Order

The global crisis is a financial crisis driven primarily by global trade and capital imbalances; and Hinde Capital believes the crisis is in full swing again and asset prices are in danger of falling globally. Money is less effective at catching the falling knife. Investors and policymakers do not believe this is the beginning of a major EM contagion crisis. They are lulling themselves into a false sense of security. They see the EM market tremors, and do not fear a re-run of the EM crises of old. They are right. This is not (just) going to be an EM crisis. The disproportionate reaction of central bankers and policymakers alike has merely succeeded in compounding and exacerbating the error of this highly imbalanced monetary system. Recent events in emerging countries are a manifestation of the continuing unravelling of our monetary order.

Via Hinde Capital,

Over the past four decades the global economy has largely experienced prolonged imbalances, with countries running large current account deficits in symbiotic relationships with those running large surpluses. In our recent HindeSight Investor Letter – Top of the BoPs (below) – we revisit our long held belief that the current monetary order as defined by a constellation of exchange rate arrangements between the major global currencies, and which maintained these imbalances artificially, has led to excessive global liquidity and credit creation. This in turn drove a litany of asset price bubbles.

The bursting of these asset bubbles has continued in a series these past two decades, each one’s demise leading to more disruptive policy responses which have only succeeded in igniting yet more bubbles, only for those too to fail.

Finally in 2008 we witnessed the finale of decades of credit creation, rising in what appeared to be a crescendo of credit excess and widespread asset booms. We saw this event as the death throes of an unstable monetary regime, only then to see an unprecedented global reaction by policymakers in a coordinated fashion to keep the global system alive. For a moment here today, there are those who dare to believe they have succeeded, with rising equity markets a testimony to a reviving global economy. Nothing could be further from reality.

We stand by our assessment that the disproportionate reaction of central bankers and policymakers alike has merely succeeded in compounding and exacerbating the error of this highly imbalanced monetary system. Recent events in emerging countries are a manifestation of the continuing unravelling of our monetary order.

In the 1980s it was a hike by the US Fed that triggered the LatAm crisis. Today, the mere whisper of tighter monetary conditions in the US, vis-a-vis a tapering of QE has led to higher bond rates globally. Note tapering is not the same as hiking interest rates.

The consequences of multiple rounds of QE have heightened global risks as it has both exacerbated ‘currency competition’ and hot capital flows into countries seeking desperately for a return both from income and capital growth. This has created major distortions in term rates, equity and bond values, driving them artificially high in price.

These distortions have created risks far greater than the fragilities of EM countries of yesterday years. The system of credit creation has produced unstable growth underpinned with collateral which is both mobile and suspect in its integrity.

Investors have nowhere to turn, emerging market countries growth is faltering in response to export disadvantages brought about by rampant G10 currency devaluations. China is finally succumbing to its side of the global imbalance excesses. First it was the deficit nations now it’s the turn of the creditor nations to falter, primarily China.

Trade flow reversals are leading to massive capital outflows out of EMs and the question remains: will the central banks of these countries sell their FX reserves, UST- bonds and euro government bonds (bunds) to finance this surge in outflows?

It is not clear that renewed global central bank liquidity provision will even stabilise a situation we see as growing dire by the day. China is the driver. All eyes on china.

We believe the bursting of the ‘Great Bond Bubble’ will lead to a formative and substantial rise in gold as official money, institutional and investor money seeks an asset that can protect us all from a global default and resetting of the monetary order. The time to buy gold is fast approaching, if that time is not already upon us.

HindeSight Investor Letter June 2013 – Top of the BoPs


Source: http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-07-15/hinde-capital-china-gold-andthe-continuing-unravelling-our-monetary-order

The Secret To How Eric Sprott & I Became Wealthy

Today one of the wealthiest people in the financial world spoke with King World News about how he and Eric Sprott became so wealthy. Rick Rule, who is business partners with billionaire Eric Sprott, also spoke about one of the greatest opportunities that he has seen in his entire career. Below is what Rule had to say in his interview.

Rule: “You know, Eric, it’s funny because right now I am up in Vancouver, and looking at the despair in the professional investment community and juxtaposing that with the strange elation that I feel has caused me to feel very contemplative.

One of the things that occurs to me is that this is my fourth major market cycle. The three previous down-cycles that I’ve been through previously were the cause of my personal wealth, and Eric Sprott’s personal wealth….

“It’s interesting that at age 60 I have a lot more patience than I did when I was age 30. And I think one of the things that’s happening right now is the fact that markets and conditions have caused me to be a 3-to-5-year thinker, and most of the people I compete with, who are 20 years younger than me, have a 2-to-3-week time frame.

And the idea that somebody who has a 2-to-3-week times frame can compete with somebody who has a 3-to-5-year time frame is very problematic. What Eric and I are trying to do in very crass terms is go from being quite wealthy, to being ludicrously wealthy.

But the reality is that we are competing with people who are trying to make payments on their 2nd house at Whistler. In other words we are competing with people who are trying to live rich as opposed to being rich, which constrains them to a very, very short time frame.

Certainly I feel bad about having paid $3 for some stock that is selling at 60 cents, but it’s not the first time I’ve ever done that, and it’s certainly not the last time I am going to do that. But what I can tell you is that the money I’ve made in my life has come about through the aggressive deployment of capital at times like these.

Source: http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/KWN_DailyWeb/Entries/2013/7/15_Rick_Rule_-_The_Secret_To_How_Eric_Sprott_%26_I_Became_Wealthy.html

Wits Gold bids for Burnstone, decision expected next week

JOHANNESBURG – Witwatersrand Consolidated Gold Resources (Wits Gold) on Friday said that it had offered to buy embattled Great Basin Gold’s (GBG’s) suspended Burnstone gold operation, in Mpumalanga.

The TSX- and JSE-listed group aimed to deliver dividends to its shareholders and generate cash flow in the near term, as Wits Gold brought Burnstone into production.

“Moving to producer status will serve as a solid platform with which to start generating free cash flow for shareholders,” Wits Gold CEO Philip Kotze said, adding that the bid was in line with the company’s strategy of owning and developing shallow mines in South Africa.

Wits Gold would pay $7.25-million in cash towards GBG South African subsidiary Southgold Exploration’s debt, which was restructured and cut by 55% to $177.35-million.

Southgold would, from generated actual cash flow, repay the remaining $170.1-million liability.

Wits Gold would also advance a $100-million shareholder loan with an interest rate of 4%, which was also to be paid back on a preferential basis from Southgold’s operating cash flow.

The offer to buy the mine would be put to vote on July 11, but Wits Gold had signed irrevocable undertakings from the major creditors that its bid would be voted for to eliminate deal uncertainty.

Burnstone was put on care and maintenance in September, after several production setbacks and an inability to afford the mine’s required working capital to reach cash-flow breakeven forced the mine into business rescue.

Kotze noted that a new underground mining plan, which would allow for flexibility in the production approach, had been developed, after due diligence found the previous mine plan “far too ambitious”.

GBG’s mine plan had created market expectations, which had resulted in the team rapidly trying to deliver into high production, at 250 000 oz/y, without the required structures in place, he explained.

Burnstone, which started producing in 2010, encountered a geological fault that GBG did not find during exploration drilling, leading to the company having to revise its 2011 production guidance to 30 000 oz – which it missed by 6 000 oz – from the previous levels between 85 000 oz and 110 000 oz.

The mine’s production target – before suspension – for 2012 was 90 000 oz to 100 000 oz.

Wits Gold lowered production by 50%, with plans in place to potentially ramp up production in a gradual phased approach to a maximum 130 000 oz/y for a $100-million investment. First production is expected 12 months after the initial takeover.

“We have a number of options that require less capital for lower production or more for higher production [than the middle ground of 50 000 oz/y],” he said, noting the current Wits Gold plan for the mine required $50-million in capital expenditure and would enable production ramp-up to about 70 000 oz/y.

Wits Gold expected to take control of the operation – which has more than six-million ounces of gold in proven and probable reserves and a forecast life-of-mine upwards of 25 years – during the second half of 2014, after which the final mine plan would be decided on according to the market at the time.

Wits Gold aimed to initially focus on establishing the appropriate infrastructure for the relevant plan, and develop until enough ore reserve had been opened up for sustainable production.

The company would complete the footwall development in advance, and create a drilling platform to predetermine the geological structure and paychannels.

Wits Gold also planned a three-dimensional seismic survey, which would constrain the highly faulted underground structure and enable mine design optimisation.

Source: http://www.miningweekly.com/article/wits-gold-bids-for-burnstone-decision-expected-next-week-2013-07-05